The nonprofit mission of Native Seeds/SEARCH is to conserve and promote arid-adapted crop diversity to nourish a changing world. We work within the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico to strengthen regional food security.
Please join us in this necessary work.

Home

A Sweet Sign of Summer: Rare Watermelons Are Back

By Sheryl Joy, NS/S Seed Distribution Coordinator. Published on April 22, 2015.

From the rich recesses of the NS/S seed vault, we are happy to bring you four watermelon varieties that have not previously been publicly available. If your garden is a good size for summer’s favorite sprawling vine, check out these varieties!

Reviving Jack Beans

By Melissa Kruse-Peeples, NS/S Conservation Program Manager. Published on March, 20, 2015.

Imagine if you could take a time machine and visit an ancient Hohokam agricultural field 1,000 years ago. The crops in that field would contain corn, green-striped cushaw squash, and tepary beans – varieties familiar to contemporary Pima and Tohono O’odham farmers. But you might also find an unusual, yet majestic, bean known today as jack beans (Canavalia ensiformis).

NS/S Is Hiring a Collections Coordinator

Native Seeds/SEARCH is accepting applications for Collections Coordinator to work at our Conservation Center in Tucson, Arizona. This position provides support for crop genetic resource conservation and interpretation of the NS/S seed bank collection.

All About Chiles

By Melissa Kruse-Peeples, NS/S Conservation Program Manager. Published on February, 20, 2015.

Whether it is red or green in New Mexico, spicy jalapenos of Tex-mex recipes, or fiery chiltepines of the borderlands, chiles are synonymous with Southwestern cuisine and central to our culinary identity. Chiles are also a large part of the agricultural economy of our region. The hot summer climate and sandy soils of southern New Mexico and Arizona come together to create a million dollar chile industry. However, you may be surprised to learn that chiles are a relatively recent part of the 4,000 year old Southwestern agricultural history and were not commonly grown or eaten until the last several hundred years.